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Home-->Miscellaneous-->High crash stats shown in work zones
 
High crash stats shown in work zones staff
Updated: 2014-04-07 13:39:20
Forty-five percent of highway contractors had motor vehicles crash into their construction work zones during the past year, according to the results of a new highway work zone study conducted by the Associated General Contractors of America. Association officials added that the study found work zone crashes are more likely to kill vehicle operators and passengers than construction workers.

“There is little margin for error when you work within a few inches of thousands of fast-moving vehicles,” said Tom Case, the chair of the association’s national highway and transportation division and senior vice president of Watsonville, California-based Granite Construction. “As the data makes clear, not enough drivers are slowing down and staying alert near work sites.”

Case said that 43 percent of contractors reported that motor vehicle operators or passengers were injured during work zone crashes this past year, and 16 percent were killed in those crashes. While they are less likely to kill construction workers, highway work zone crashes do pose a significant risk for people in hard hats, Case added. He noted that more than 20 percent of work zone crashes injure construction workers, and 6 percent of those crashes kill them.

Work zone crashes also have a pronounced impact on construction schedules and costs, Case said. He noted that 25 percent of contractors reported that work zone crashes during the past year have forced them to temporarily shut down construction activity. Those delays were often lengthy, as 38 percent of those project shutdowns lasted two or more days.

Association officials said that 67 percent of contractors nationwide feel that tougher laws, fines and legal penalties for moving violations in work zones would reduce injuries and fatalities. In addition, 74 percent of contractors said that an increased use of concrete barriers will help reduce injuries and fatalities. And 66 percent of contractors nationwide agree that more frequent safety training for workers could help. They added that many firms and the association have crafted these types of highway safety programs.

But Case suggested that the best way to improve safety was for motorists to be more careful while driving through highway work zones. “Ensuring proper work zone safety starts and ends with cautious drivers,” Case said.

The work zone safety study was based on a nationwide survey of highway construction firms conducted by the association in March this year. More than 400 contractors completed the survey nationwide, while a large enough sample of contractors in six states completed the survey to allow for state-specific results.

In 2012, Governor Jay Nixon and the Missouri General Assembly added MoDOT vehicles to the “Move Over” law, which protects law enforcement and emergency response vehicles parked on the side of the road. This law requires motorists to slow down or change lanes when approaching these vehicles, and now includes MoDOT vehicles parked with amber and white lights flashing.

In Missouri the following was reported:

  • In 2013, 8 people were killed in work zones, compared to 7 in 2012.

  • Between 2009 and 2013, 53 people were killed and 2,781 people were injured in Missouri work zones.

  • Since 2000, 16 MoDOT employees have been killed in the line of duty.

  • The top five contributing circumstances for work zone crashes in 2013 were following too closely, improper lane use or changing lanes, inattention, driving too fast for conditions, and failure to yield -- in that order.

  • The best defense in a work zone crash, or any crash, is a seat belt. In 2013, 63 percent of vehicle occupant fatalities were not wearing a seat belt.

Hit a worker laws in Missouri include:

  • A fine for killing or injuring a highway worker of up to $10,000 and loss of their license for a year.

  • Creation of two new crimes -- endangerment of a highway worker and aggravated endangerment of a highway worker.

  • Setting a $75 fine for any person convicted of a second or subsequent moving violation within a work zone; any person convicted of a second or subsequent speeding or passing violation in a work zone will get a $300 fine.

  • Expanding the definition of highway worker to cover suppliers and delivery personnel.

    When traveling on Missouri highways, MoDot suggests consulting its map of work zones. It may be found here.

    Move Over Laws by state may be found here.

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